A Look At How Forest Ownership Impacts Conservation Tools

Jun 8, 2015

A talk this week will focus on forest ownership and conservation.

Credit Submitted photo

 

Adena Rissman is on the faculty in UW Madison, studying relationships between people and natural resources.

 

She says major changes in public and private land ownership patterns have shaped forest conservation.  

 

“As of 1999 --so just about 15 years ago -- a million acres of land was held by large paper and lumber companies," she said. "And now almost all of that land has transitioned to other companies - mostly to large real estate and timber investment organizations, as well as to small private landowners, public agencies and others.”  

 

At this month's informal lecture series Science on Tap, Rissman will give an overview of different conservation tools being used, and what their implications are.

 

 

 

Rissman says part of what’s significant about forests is that they are valued in many ways, from their role in the timber industry, to recreation and wildlife habitat.  

 

“I think there’s really a whole wide range of benefits that these forests can provide," she said, "and I think that’s why forests are important to so many different kinds of people.”

 

Her talk is 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Minocqua Brewing Company.