Mackenzie Martin

Mackenzie worked at WXPR from 2016-2019 in various roles. She started as the Operations Director and Morning Edition host, then moved into the position of Features Editor and Morning Edition host. Mackenzie is passionate about reporting and editing stories that cover interesting people and places in the Northwoods as part of WXPR's series: We Live Up Here and Curious North.

Mackenzie's work has also been heard on NPR's Morning Edition, NPR's All Things Considered, Minnesota Public Radio, and Wisconsin Public Radio. In 2019, Mackenzie won four awards from the Wisconsin Broadcasters Association, including two 1st place awards for Best Interview and Best Web Story.

Mackenzie holds an undergraduate degree in media & cultural studies from Macalester College in Saint Paul, Minnesota. She's originally from Wausau, Wisconsin.

Most snowshoes in the United States are probably in storage right now, gathering dust and waiting for temperatures to drop. In the town of Lake Tomahawk in the Northwoods of Wisconsin though, they're getting a lot of use this summer.

Snowshoe baseball is exactly what it sounds like. It's a game of baseball played on snowshoes, though it more closely resembles a bizarre game of softball.

Michigan Technological University

Climate Change can be overwhelming to think about.

Author Nancy Langston has been researching Lake Superior for over a decade now though and she says local stories of people taking action give her hope.

Larry Lapachin continues our We Live Up Here series with the story.

 

Jim Skibo / WXPR Public Radio

We continue our We Live Up Here series this week with a story of a family-owned fishing lure manufacturer in Antigo that uses squirrel tail hair on their famous Mepps spinners.

Jim Skibo has the story.

Mackenzie Martin / WXPR Public Radio

AUGUST 19, 2019 IMPORTANT UPDATE: The Oneida County Health Department does not recommend drinking from the Crescent Spring because the test for PFAS came back as positive. More information can be found in a report here from WXPR's Mackenzie Martin.

  • Wildfire smoke from Canada filled northwestern skies yesterday,
  • the WIB is concerned about an increase in contracts awarded to out-of-state companies,
  • a bipartisan group of legislators has offered bills to help stop Lyme Disease,
  • and UW System President Ray Cross says the legislature "kicked us in the shins."

  • The legislature is expected to take up drunk driving bills this week,
  • Wisconsin's ginseng farmers are feeling a pinch from the trade war with China,
  • volunteers are needed Saturday to help clean up the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest,
  • farmers are losing thousands of dollars as rain keeps them out of their fields,
  • and Eau Claire firefighteres had to rescue a kayaker from the Chippewa River on Monday.

Contributed Photograph

In March, Misty Jackson from the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians participated in a fashion show with the goal of highlighting the problem of missing and murdered indigenous women.

Beth Tornes continues our We Live Up Here series with the story.

Jim Skibo

We continue our We Live Up Here series this week with a story about an ambitious DIY project that has been 30 years in the making.

The story comes in response to a listener question to our Curious North series. Dennis Marquardt from Tomahawk asks: What is up with the castle on Killarney Lake?

Jim Skibo has the story.

WISCONSIN HISTORICAL SOCIETY, IMAGE ID: 4111, WISCONSINHISTORY.ORG

This week’s A Northwoods Moment in History is in response to two WXPR listeners who submitted questions to our new Curious North series.

An anonymous listener from Lake Tomahawk asked: Did the French and British occupy Wisconsin? What happened in the war of 1812 in the state?

In addition, Jane Nicholson from Manitowish Waters asked: What were the first initiatives of the US government in our area? Who was sent here and for what purposes/initiatives?

Reddit/Imgur

Since March, we've been collecting your questions for a new series at WXPR called Curious North. Today we're answering one of those questions as part of our We Live Up Here series.

Melissa Nieman in Tomahawk recently asked: Can we agree on a pronunciation of the word sauna?!

Mackenzie Martin talked to two linguistic researchers to try and figure out the answer.

Courtesty of Grandview Orchard

There is a growing market for locally grown food produced without the use of synthetic chemicals.

In Antigo, the 100-year-old Grandview Orchard in Antigo is slowly being transformed to organic production.

Jim Skibo continues our We Live Up Here series with the story.

Have you ever dreamed of quitting your job and buying a farm? Lisa Rettinger has done just that. Four years ago, she quit her job in the Twin Cities and purchased a 110-year-old apple orchard just a few miles east of Antigo.

WISCONSIN HISTORICAL SOCIETY, IMAGE ID: 5826, WISCONSINHISTORY.ORG

Throughout the last year, our local historian Gary Entz has uncovered why many towns in the Northwoods are named what they are.

Some previous installments of A Northwoods Moment in History have included how the communities of Gagen, Phelps, St. Germain, Sayner, and Rhinelander got their names.

WISCONSIN HISTORICAL SOCIETY, IMAGE ID: 128072, WISCONSINHISTORY.ORG

Trees For Tomorrow in Eagle River is celebrating their 75th anniversary this year.

As part of our We Live Up Here series, Mackenzie Martin talked to their executive director about the importance of teaching children about conservation in our forests.

Trees For Tomorrow in Eagle River celebrated their 75th anniversary of operation as a nonprofit natural resource specialty school in February.

Courtesy of the SISU Endurance Team

The Ironwood/Hurley area can get up to 200 inches of annual snowfall, in part due to their close proximity to Lake Superior.

This makes for great skiing, but it was only recently that a youth-based cross country ski program began in the area, named for the Finnish concept Sisu, that has to do with resilience.

Last week, they wrapped up the season with 25 youth participants. Larry Lapachin continues our We Live Up Here series with the story.

Are you curious about about our region, its people, and its culture?

WXPR is launching a new project that aims to answer questions about those very topics.

Curious North invites you to take part in the stories we cover. It’s guided by you, our listeners, and your curiosity about our region – from Central Wisconsin to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.

Pages