Mackenzie Martin

Mackenzie worked at WXPR from 2016-2019 in various roles. She started as the Operations Director and Morning Edition host, then moved into the position of Features Editor and Morning Edition host. Mackenzie is passionate about reporting and editing stories that cover interesting people and places in the Northwoods as part of WXPR's series: We Live Up Here and Curious North.

Mackenzie's work has also been heard on NPR's Morning Edition, NPR's All Things Considered, Minnesota Public Radio, and Wisconsin Public Radio. In 2019, Mackenzie won four awards from the Wisconsin Broadcasters Association, including two 1st place awards for Best Interview and Best Web Story.

Mackenzie holds an undergraduate degree in media & cultural studies from Macalester College in Saint Paul, Minnesota. She's originally from Wausau, Wisconsin.

Pxhere

For literate adults, it might be hard to remember what the process of learning to read felt like. For kids with dyslexia in Wisconsin though, learning how to read can be maddening. Help might be on the way though as two dyslexia bills circulate in Madison.

 

As part of our We Live Up Here series, Mackenzie Martin talks to a local reading specialist and a Rhinelander High School student with dyslexia.

 

 

 

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They say playing on sports teams in high school prepares you for the future in a lot of ways.

For one former Rhinelander High School football player, the way he learned how to tackle in high school set him up to save a former president's life.

Gary Entz has the story this week for A Northwoods Moment in History.

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Archaeology in the Northwoods is different than it is downstate, and it can serve as a window into the everyday lives of former Northwoods residents.

As part of WXPR's We Live Up Here series, Ardis Berghoff has the story.

When most people think of archaeology, the discovery of ancient civilizations in places like Egypt, Greece or Peru come to mind. But archaeologists work in the Northwoods, too.

Courtesy of Kelly Jackson

Musician Kelly Jackson lives in Madison right now, but she's originally from Lac du Flambeau.

As part of WXPR's We Live Up Here series, Beth Tornes talked to Jackson about her musical influences and how she uses music as medicine.

For Lac du Flambeau musician Kelly Jackson, music is medicine, and has the power to heal. Music has always been part of her life, ever since she was a child and grew up listening to country music.

Library of Congress

In this week's A Northwoods Moment in History, Gary Entz tell us how the city of Rhinelander got its name.

Mackenzie Martin / WXPR

When was the last time you intentionally took a break during the day? Fika Bakery & Coffee in Three Lakes gets its name from the traditional Swedish coffee break known as fika and the woman behind it thinks you should take more of them.

Mackenzie Martin continues our We Live Up Here series this week with the story.

Coffee breaks are and have always been an important part of life in many countries. In the U.S., we often use coffee as a stimulant to get us going in the morning or to refuel us midday.

  

  • It’s Data Privacy day and an official says you might not be as safe online as you think,
  • a meeting tonight in Rhinelander is designed to help people stay away from Diabetes,
  • and a firefighter was injured in a weekend house fire in Prentice.

  • Northern Wisconsin is dealing with a shortage of EMS providers,
  • January is Stalking Awareness Month and a local agency is here to help,
  • Marshfield Clinic is offering a way to lose weight this year,
  • Wisconsin continues to consider medical Marijuana,
  • and it's also Glaucoma Awareness Month.

Nate Sheppard (natesheppard.com)

During the Great Depression, there was what was known as a hobo jungle in Rhinelander.

This Saturday, January 12th, ArtStart Rhinelander is holding a community event to remember it. The event ties in nicely with Dark Airing, an art exhibit on display at ArtStart through January 12th that features symbols hobos used back in the day to communicate with one another.

  • Tony Evers becomes Wisconsin's 46th governor today,
  • Mike McCabe, who ran against Tony Evers in the primary, speaks to Ken Krall about the change in Wisconsin politics,
  • and January is blood donor month and the need for local Northwoods blood is critical.

For the last two years, Mary Burns’ exhibit featuring weavings of ancestral women of Wisconsin’s 12 tribes has been traveling around the area. Thanks to a group of women from the Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians though, the exhibit is now being brought to life.

Mackenzie Martin continues our We Live Up Here series with the story of 22 weavings and one theater performance that together are celebrating native women in Wisconsin.

  • Human remains have been found after a house fire in Langlade County,
  • Don't drive drunk this New Year's Eve, there are free rides available in much of the Northwoods,
  • If an animal or plant is not on the invasive species list, you can put it here,
  • and we have the winners and losers from the signing of the Farm Bill.

The Great Thanksgiving Listen is a national effort from StoryCorps that aims to help young people—and people of all ages—to create an oral history of the United States by recording an interview with an elder.

This year, as part of a partnership with WXPR, classes of freshmen at Rhinelander High School participated in the national effort for the first time.

Suzanne Flory

The Great Thanksgiving Listen is a national effort from StoryCorps that aims to help young people—and people of all ages—to create an oral history of the United States by recording an interview with an elder.

This year, as part of a partnership with WXPR, classes of freshmen at Rhinelander High School participated in the national effort for the first time.

Wisconsin Historical Society, Image ID: 53541, wisconsinhistory.org

For many children, writing a letter to Santa has always been an important part of this time of the year.

Back in 1929 though, the letters reflected hardships in Rhinelander families. Gary Entz remembers those families this week as part of our continued series A Northwoods Moment in History.

Thanks to Liana Teter, Brynn Teter, and Cooper Dick for reading the letters from 1929.

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