Local Features

In addition to the local news, WXPR Public Radio also likes to find stories that are outside the general news cycle... Listen below to stories about history, people, culture, art, and the environment in the Northwoods that go a little deeper than a traditional news story allows us to do.

These features are also available as a podcast by searching "WXPR Local Features" wherever you get your podcasts.

Nate Sheppard (natesheppard.com)

During the Great Depression, there was what was known as a hobo jungle in Rhinelander.

This Saturday, January 12th, ArtStart Rhinelander is holding a community event to remember it. The event ties in nicely with Dark Airing, an art exhibit on display at ArtStart through January 12th that features symbols hobos used back in the day to communicate with one another.

Silus Grok / Wikimedia Commons

During early December of 2018, Wisconsin legislators passed a bill restricting the period for early voting.

This measure has been controversial and has garnered national spotlight, but how does it impact the Northwoods? WXPR’s Joshua Junig has the story.

On December 14, then-Governor Scott Walker signed three pieces of Republican-sponsored legislation as his administration prepared to leave office. Among those measures is a bill mandating the early voting period to open two weeks prior to election day.

WISCONSIN HISTORICAL SOCIETY, IMAGE ID: 131293, WISCONSINHISTORY.ORG

This week on A Northwoods Moment in History, Gary Entz looks back on the life of Rhinelander's Paul Browne.

There have been many notable people who have lived and worked in Rhinelander in the 137 years of its existence as a town.  The men who built the logging industry clearly defined its early history, but few have had as lasting an impact on the ongoing character of the city as did Paul Browne.

Scott Bowe

It's the second Tuesday of the month, which is when we hear from our commentators in the field.

In this month's installment of Field Notes, Scott Bowe of Kemp Station discusses how trees adapt with changes in elevation.

In my last Field Notes broadcast, I spoke about the amazing human body and how it adapts to working and playing at high elevations. Elevation has impact on other organisms besides humans. Let’s look at elevation and how trees adapt to this harsh environment.

National Park Service / Wikimedia Commons

There are a few animals that were probably present here but have been lost in the last hundred years or more.

In this week’s Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist considers past records of the wolverine in Wisconsin.

For the last two years, Mary Burns’ exhibit featuring weavings of ancestral women of Wisconsin’s 12 tribes has been traveling around the area. Thanks to a group of women from the Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians though, the exhibit is now being brought to life.

Mackenzie Martin continues our We Live Up Here series with the story of 22 weavings and one theater performance that together are celebrating native women in Wisconsin.

Eagle River Chamber of Commerce

Since 1933, volunteers in the Eagle River area have been getting together around this time of the year to build an ice castle.

How did this tradition start, though? Gary Entz has the story as part of our weekly series A Northwoods Moment in History.

www.forthwithlife.co.uk

With the arrival of New Years Day comes new resolutions. Have you made yours?

The Masked Biologist has, and it is the subject of this week’s Wildlife Matters.

The Great Thanksgiving Listen is a national effort from StoryCorps that aims to help young people—and people of all ages—to create an oral history of the United States by recording an interview with an elder.

This year, as part of a partnership with WXPR, classes of freshmen at Rhinelander High School participated in the national effort for the first time.

Wisconsin Historical Society, Image ID: 58531, wisconsinhistory.org

With winter officially beginning last Friday, Gary Entz tells us about winter logging this week as part of our continued series A Northwoods Moment in History.

Camilla Cerea/Audubon

Do you have a special holiday tradition that includes the outdoors?

The Masked Biologist shares the history of the side hunt, and the Christmas Bird Count, in this week’s Wildlife Matters.

Suzanne Flory

The Great Thanksgiving Listen is a national effort from StoryCorps that aims to help young people—and people of all ages—to create an oral history of the United States by recording an interview with an elder.

This year, as part of a partnership with WXPR, classes of freshmen at Rhinelander High School participated in the national effort for the first time.

Wisconsin Historical Society, Image ID: 53541, wisconsinhistory.org

For many children, writing a letter to Santa has always been an important part of this time of the year.

Back in 1929 though, the letters reflected hardships in Rhinelander families. Gary Entz remembers those families this week as part of our continued series A Northwoods Moment in History.

Thanks to Liana Teter, Brynn Teter, and Cooper Dick for reading the letters from 1929.

WI Dept. of Natural Resources.

What is the most common species of dog used for small game hunting in Wisconsin?

The Masked Biologist talks hunting dog breeds in this week’s Wildlife Matters.

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