Program Changes

Starting Monday, March 16 you may notice a change in WXPR’s music programming. To ensure the well-being of our station and volunteers during this virus outbreak, we are asking our volunteer on-air hosts to remain at home.

WXPR will continue to be your source for information and news. You’ll hear the latest news during All Things Considered and Morning Edition and local updates as needed during the WXPR newscasts and online at www.WXPR.org.

Working together we will continue to keep the communities we serve informed.

Thank you,

Jessie Dick

WXPR General Manager

Ireland is delaying its next phase of reopening, keeping bars closed and extending other restrictions in response to a recent rise in coronavirus cases.

The country was set to enter the fourth and final phase of its incremental reopening plan on July 20. Prime Minister Micheál Martin announced Wednesday that current restrictions will remain in place until Aug. 10.

Parents, teachers and students across the country are gearing up for the new school year. But what school will look like is still a mystery.

As New York City's COVID-19 numbers improve, more and more of the city is reopening. The High Line opens Thursday with ticketed entry. It's one of the first big attractions to reopen in the city.

There will be no Rose Parade on New Year's Day in 2021, marking the first cancellation of the annual spectacle since World War II.

Organizers of the colorful Pasadena, Calif., tradition announced on Wednesday that they would be unable to host the parade in accordance with the state's reopening timeline and "after thoughtful consideration of the restrictions and guidelines in place as a result of COVID-19."

One in five people in Los Angeles County is out of work, according to California's latest unemployment numbers. And that means a lot of people can't pay the rent.

The World Health Organization and UNICEF said on Wednesday that they anticipate an "alarming decline" in the number of children receiving potentially life-saving vaccines due to the coronavirus pandemic.

The United Nations organizations warned of the first drop in 28 years for vaccines against diptheria, tetanus, and pertussis (DPT3) — a marker for immunization coverage — based on preliminary data from the first four months of 2020.

Broadcast ratings for nearly all of NPR's radio shows took a steep dive in major markets this spring, as the coronavirus pandemic kept many Americans from commuting to work and school. The network's shows lost roughly a quarter of their audience between the second quarter of 2019 and the same months in 2020.

Oil prices are low, and likely to stay that way for a while. And while low prices can be brutal for oil producers, they're also an opportunity: When the going gets tough, Big Oil often gets even bigger.

But will the pandemic-induced price collapse lead to dramatic deal-making and companies scaling up? Some analysts aren't holding their breath.

"I do believe that the golden age of the mega deals in oil and gas may be gone," says Muqsit Ashraf, who leads the energy practice for the consulting firm Accenture.

Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt has tested positive for the coronavirus, becoming the first U.S. governor known to have been infected during the COVID-19 crisis.

Stitt, a Republican, disclosed his illness during a press conference Wednesday over Zoom. He said that he had been tested the day before and that he has been getting tested periodically.

"I feel fine. I felt a little bit achy yesterday, didn't have a fever but just a little bit achy," the governor said. "So just did my regular testing, and it came back positive."

In Florida, an additional 10,181 people tested positive for the coronavirus Wednesday, bringing the state's total to more than 301,810 cases. Florida has averaged more than 10,000 cases a day for the past week, and some public health experts said the peak is still weeks away.

Before Justinian Huang left Shanghai for some beach time in Malaysia last winter, he took his dog Swagger to stay with a friend.

"I dropped him off. I kissed him goodbye. I was like, 'I'm going to see you in six days,' " Huang recounts. "That was Jan. 23 of this year."

That week the coronavirus spread with alarming speed in China. So Huang decided to wait it out in Malaysia a few extra days. Then he flew to Taiwan, where he has family, and finally home to the United States.

Updated 4:05 p.m. ET

The Trump Administration has mandated that hospitals sidestep the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and send critical information about COVID-19 hospitalizations and equipment to a different federal database.

From the start of the pandemic, the CDC has collected data on COVID-19 hospitalizations, availability of intensive care beds and personal protective equipment. But hospitals must now report that information to the Department of Health and Human Services, which oversees the CDC.

Updated at 5 p.m. ET

Walmart says shoppers must wear masks inside its stores starting Monday — the largest retailer to join a growing list of companies making face covering mandatory across the nation.

Israel Shippy doesn't remember much about having COVID-19 – or the unusual auto-immune disease it triggered – other than being groggy and uncomfortable for a bunch of days. He's a five-year-old, and would much rather talk about cartoons, or the ideas for inventions that constantly pop into his head.

"Hold your horses, I think I know what I'm gonna make," he says, holding up a finger in the middle of a conversation. "I'm gonna make something that lights up and attaches to things with glue, so if you don't have a flashlight, you can just use it!"

The economy is tanking across the country, with layoffs and bankruptcies as far as the eye can see. But the richest sliver of the country continues to do quite well, thank you.

The latest evidence came Wednesday morning as Goldman Sachs, the bluest of blue-chip banks, said it's raking in money on Wall Street.

While other banks are warning about rising loan losses during the recession, Goldman, which tends to serve a higher-end clientele, is sounding a pretty optimistic note.

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