climate change

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Students and others are protesting Friday across the globe about climate change and there's a rally in Minocqua Friday to join in.

Northwoods environmental groups are rallying to support the effort. Local advocate David Barnhill says The student climate strike movement began in 2018 when 15-year-old Swedish student Greta Thunberg decided she had to take action. She stopped going to school and sat outside the Swedish Parliament with a sign saying “school strike for climate.” Soon others joined her, word spread, and students in Europe began to strike on Fridays.

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The groups Our Wisconsin Revolution (Northwoods Chapter) and Northwoods Climate Action Network will hold a public presentation and discussion concerning the recent surge of activism in response to the climate crisis.

The event will take place Tuesday at the Walter E. Olson Memorial Library in Eagle River from 4:00 to 5:30 pm.

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A meeting Monday in Minocqua will examine a growing youth movement centered on the need to thwart climate change.

The groups Our Wisconsin Revolution (Northwoods Chapter) and Northwoods Climate Action Network will hold a public presentation on the recent surge of activism.

David Barnhill is the retired Director of Environmental Studies at U.W. Oshkosh. He now lives in Hazelhurst and is chair of the local groups. He says not since the Vietnam War have young people become this active...

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One of the nation's top experts on a changing climate will be in Three Lakes Saturday along with two friends. They are billed as "The Three Tenors of Climate Change".

Dr. Ben Santer of California's Lawrence Livermore Lab, Dr. Hernando Garzon of California and Chip Duncan, a documentary filmaker will be at Three Lakes Center For the Arts. Santer says the presentation is an opportunity to hear from the public on what their concern are and to have conversation without the loud back-and-forth that has occured.

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MILWAUKEE - While warmer average temperatures can have a dramatic impact on colder climates globally, new research shows how much it can affect crop growth if it changes by just a few degrees Celsius. For Wisconsin, one crop that would be affected most is corn.

The research, headed by postdoctoral researcher Michelle Tigchelaar at the University of Washington, shows that a 2-to-4-degrees Celsius increase in average temperature would decrease crop yields by at least 18 percent across the United States.

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Climate change and how it is affecting Wisconsin will be the focus of a meeting Monday in Minocqua.

Retired DNR scientist Dr. Mike Meyer will present information on the impact that global warming has had on Wisconsin and the expected changes for Wisconsin's wildlife, forests, lakes, and fisheries in a warmer and perhaps wetter future.

David Barnhill is retired Director of Environmental Studies at UW-Oshkosh and Chair of the Northwoods Climate Action Network, which is hosting the event.

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During Earth Day this coming Monday, the group Northwoods Climate Action Network will hold a public presentation and discussion in Minocqua on the Green New Deal.

Democrats in Congress have proposed the Green New Deal as a way to fight climate change and create jobs. David Barnhill will lead the presentation. Barnhill is chair of the Northwoods Climate Action Network and co-chair of the local group Our Wisconsin of the Northwoods. He talked to Ken Krall about the presentation...

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Events are scheduled Saturday in more than 80 countries, and also here in the Northwoods, to highlight climate change, jobs and justice. It's called the Global Day of Action.

Northwoods Climate Action and co-chair of Our Wisconsin, David Barnhill, talks about the effort....

New Research Shows Large Impacts on Crops from Climate Change

Jul 5, 2018
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MILWAUKEE - While warmer average temperatures can have a dramatic impact on colder climates globally, new research shows how much it can affect crop growth if it changes by just a few degrees Celsius.

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Wisconsin News Connection is here.

MADISON, Wis. - With climate change becoming a larger and larger headline, many wonder what their part of the Midwestern landscape could look like in 20 years.

Climate Change Denial Could Weaken U.S. Disaster Plans

Mar 30, 2018
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Scientists say the effects of climate change are being ignored by federal government disaster planners, to the potential detriment of millions of Americans.

Officials in agencies such as the Environmental Protection Agnecy and Federal Emergency Management Agency, at the request of the Trump administration, have stopped incorporating climate change into their plans for responding to catastrophic events, leaving Americans vulnerable to increasingly intense floods, tornadoes, earthquakes, wildfires and other disasters.

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A local researcher will discuss the impacts of climate change on lakes...both small and large... at Nicolet College in Rhinelander this week.

The "Our Changing World" presentation will be given by John Lenters, honorary fellow at the UW-Madison Center for Limnology.

Wisconsin Research: Fuel Mandate Fueling Climate Change

Nov 24, 2017
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Wisconsin News Connection is here.

MADISON, Wis. -- A new report examines how the expansion of cropland in Wisconsin and other states as the result of the ethanol mandate has contributed to the surge in climate change pollution.

The mandate, enacted in 2007, requires certain amounts of plant-derived fuels to be blended into gasoline. Research from the University of Wisconsin found that, as a result, more than 7 million acres of habitat have been plowed under for corn and soy across the country.

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MADISON, Wis. - Experts on climate, wildlife habitat, winter sports and other outdoor activities will participated  in a panel discussion at the Wisconsin Science Fest.

Pat Durkin, a veteran outdoorsman and president of the state Outdoor Writers Association, moderated a panel of scientists and specialists,  about the impact of climate change on outdoor recreation in Wisconsin.

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A speaker coming to Nicolet College in Rhinelander Wednesday says each person is responsible to tackle climate change.

Pam McVety will present the "ABC's of Climate Change and Science..."

Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. at the Nicolet College Theatre. McVety retired after a 30 year career with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection where she became deputy secretary of the agency.

She says action must be taken now to stop even worse changes...

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