Local Features

In addition to the local news, WXPR Public Radio also likes to find stories that are outside the general news cycle... Listen below to stories about people, culture, and art in the Northwoods that go a little deeper than a traditional news story allows us to do.

These features are also available as a podcast by searching "WXPR Local Features" wherever you get your podcasts.

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Knowing Our Maples

May 8, 2018
Kyle Lawrence / Wikimedia Commons

In this month's installment of Field Notes Scott Bowe of Kemp Station discusses Wisconsin’s maples and how they are used in homes and schools.

Wisconsin has seven native maple trees and many more non-native ornamental maples, with some of these considered invasive. We all know the sugar maple, our state tree, but the others are less well known. Let’s look at Wisconsin’s maples and how they are used in our daily lives.

Dwight Burdette / Wikimedia Commons

Organisms change over time in response to the environment around them.

In this episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist examines adaptations and evolution.

John Kees / Wikimedia Commons

Constructing a bird house can be a satisfying activity both when construction is complete and when you see birds successfully using it to raise their young.

In this episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist shares some pointers for building a safe and successful bird house.

Wikimedia Commons

The bird songs continue to increase as winter turns to spring and our migratory bird species return to claim their territory.

In this episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist examines bird migration in relation to their nesting ground selection.

Three Spring Beauties

Apr 10, 2018
Contributed Photograph

In this episode of Field Notes, Susan Knight gives us three reasons to look forward to spring.

I am a huge fan of winter.  But once the snow is clearly on its way out, who doesn’t start thinking about spring?  And what says spring better than … skunk cabbage?

Wikimedia Commons

There are many different signals that spring has arrived. In today’s episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist talks about a regional favorite—sugaring.

Wisconsin Dept. of Natural Resources

As our weather turns to spring, some of our thoughts might turn to winterkill. In this episode of Wildlife Matters, the masked biologist looks at lakes under ice and why winterkill happens.

Jon Preston / National Park Service

After an extended absence, Wisconsin’s elk reintroduction efforts have brought the population levels to a healthy enough level to allow a very small elk harvest this fall.

In this episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist takes a brief look at Wisconsin’s largest mammal.

Kayla Breese/Northwoods River News

Have you ever felt like you’re talking to someone, but they just aren’t reading your body language?

The New York based dance company the Equus Projects will be performing “The Breaking Ring” at ArtStart in downtown Rhinelander this weekend and they’ve made a name for themselves by listening and responding to the way humans — and horses — move.

In this month's installment of Field Notes, Scott Bowe of Kemp Station discusses how forests change over time.

WXPR Public Radio

Its back to basics for the Masked Biologist this week, as he talks about the value and importance of continuing education and certification in this episode of Wildlife Matters.

Wisconsin Dept. of Natural Resources

How much do you know about Wisconsin’s rabbits and hares?

In this week’s episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist examines the lagomorphs of Wisconsin.

Wikimedia Commons

Wildlife needs to adapt to its place on the globe to survive, not to mention thrive.

In this installment of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist takes a look at another generally accepted principle of adaptation to life in the north: Allen’s Rule.

Wikipedia Commons

The winter Olympics are going on now, not only in South Korea but also right here in Wisconsin’s Northwoods. In this episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist highlights the athletic river otter.

In this month’s episode of Field Notes, Susan Knight explains how a tiny relative of our mosquito holds the key to all that chocolate you plan to eat tomorrow on Valentine’s Day.

Valentine’s Day is coming up, and with it, a celebration of chocolate. Almost everyone loves chocolate, but you may not realize that the hero of the chocolate story is a tiny biting midge, a relative of our friends the mosquito and black fly.

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