Scott Bowe

Commentator - Field Notes

Scott Bowe is the Director of Kemp Natural Resources Station and Professor & Wood Products Extension Specialist in the Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Scott works closely with the forest products industry in Wisconsin. His current projects focus on forest products markets, sawlog economic maturity, and wood manufacturing process improvement; all strategies for remaining competitive within a global forest products marketplace.

Scott Bowe

In this month's installment of Field Notes, Scott Bowe of Kemp Station discusses how maple trees produce sap for real maple syrup.

If you are a winter enthusiast, we are off to a great start this year. Snowshoers, skiers, and snowmobilers have had excellent snow conditions. To add to the great snow conditions, we have enjoyed relatively mild temperatures. So how does snow form and what are the different types of snow?

In this month's installment of Field Notes, Scott Bowe of Kemp Station discusses how the Lacey Act protects rare trees around the world.

Pens and Photo by Scott Bowe

In this month's installment of Field Notes Scott Bowe of Kemp Station discusses bird’s-eye wood, some of the most beautiful material a woodworker can use.

When I say “figure in wood” you may not be familiar with the phrase.  But if I say bird’s-eye maple, an image of beautiful swirls pops into your mind.  There are many other types of wood figure such as curly, tiger stripe, fiddleback, and quilted, but I would like to focus on bird’s-eye today.

Scott Bowe

In this month's installment of Field Notes, Scott Bowe of Kemp Station discusses trees and their resistance to decay fungi.

Scott Bowe

In this month's installment of Field Notes, Scott Bowe of Kemp Station discusses snow load and how it impacts our homes.

Scott Bowe

It's the second Tuesday of the month, which is when we hear from our commentators in the field.

In this month's installment of Field Notes, Scott Bowe of Kemp Station discusses how trees adapt with changes in elevation.

In my last Field Notes broadcast, I spoke about the amazing human body and how it adapts to working and playing at high elevations. Elevation has impact on other organisms besides humans. Let’s look at elevation and how trees adapt to this harsh environment.

Scott Bowe

In this month's installment of Field Notes, Scott Bowe of Kemp Station discusses how the body adapts to recreation in high elevations.

Scott Bowe

In this month's installment of Field Notes, Scott Bowe of Kemp Station discusses Milkweed in Wisconsin.

Knowing Our Oaks

Jul 10, 2018
Max Pixel

In this month's installment of Field Notes Scott Bowe of Kemp Station discusses Wisconsin’s oaks and how they are used in our daily lives.

Knowing Our Maples

May 8, 2018
Kyle Lawrence / Wikimedia Commons

In this month's installment of Field Notes Scott Bowe of Kemp Station discusses Wisconsin’s maples and how they are used in homes and schools.

Wisconsin has seven native maple trees and many more non-native ornamental maples, with some of these considered invasive. We all know the sugar maple, our state tree, but the others are less well known. Let’s look at Wisconsin’s maples and how they are used in our daily lives.

In this month's installment of Field Notes, Scott Bowe of Kemp Station discusses how forests change over time.

Scott Bowe

In this month's installment of Field Notes Scott Bowe of Kemp Station discusses Lichens in Wisconsin’s forests, a fascinating organism commonly overlooked.

R Bruce Allison

In this month's installment of Field Notes, Scott Bowe of Kemp Station discusses sound waves.

In this month's installment of Field Notes Scott Bowe of Kemp Station discusses reclaimed wood, how nothing in Nature goes to waste.

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