We Live Up Here

We Live Up Here is where we feature some of our favorite WXPR stories... stories that weren't necessarilly newsworthy, but that helped us understand a little bit more about our neighbors and life in the Northwoods.

You can keep track of all of our local features on the WXPR Local Features podcast.  

Do you have an idea for something that WXPR should do a feature on? Shoot WXPR Features Editor Mackenzie Martin an email: mackenzie@wxpr.org

Holiday Acres Resort

Summer tourism in the Northwoods is ending and some of our seasonal residents are leaving the Northwoods for their permanent homes elsewhere.

At Holiday Acres Resort in Rhinelander, a dedicated group of family and friends have been coming up the last week of July every year for almost 50 years. Holiday Acres recently asked some of them to interview each other about what that tradition and the Northwoods as a whole means to them.

Holiday Acres Resort

Summer tourism in the Northwoods is ending and some of our seasonal residents are leaving the Northwoods for their permanent homes elsewhere.

At Holiday Acres Resort in Rhinelander, a dedicated group of family and friends have been coming up the last week of July every year for almost 50 years. Holiday Acres recently asked some of them to interview each other about what that tradition and the Northwoods as a whole means to them.

Mackenzie Martin

Northern Wisconsin is full of many different types of wild mushrooms in September. Some edible, some poisonous, and everything in between. How to tell the differences between them is in the details.

Mackenzie Martin went into the woods to learn more.

We’re looking for mushrooms in the forest at Kemp Natural Resources Station in Woodruff and someone just found chaga. It’s a type of mushroom that you can make tea out of. It typically grows on birch trees.

The Poet of the Pines

Aug 31, 2018
Mackenzie Martin / WXPR

As part of our We Live Up Here series, we're telling stories about the people and culture of northern Wisconsin. 

Today, Northwoods resident Kathryn Luttkus Craffey has a story about the relationship between her grandfather and the Northwoods Poet Enos Hayward, also known as the "Poet of the Pines."

Creating an Oasis for Pollinators

Aug 24, 2018
Nora Eckert / WXPR

Pollinators have come under threat in recent years and many people in the Northwoods are responding by creating pollinator gardens.

WXPR’s Nora Eckert has the story of one Minocqua family who has gone to especially great lengths to help pollinators thrive.

Valerie Burns’ house is overflowing with life.

Todd Brown

In 1978, a horror film was made in Oneida County. Odds are you haven't seen it.

Mackenzie Martin tells us about the making of the movie and talks to those who love it ahead of a special 40th anniversary screening at Rouman Cinema in Rhinelander on Saturday, August 18th at 5:00 p.m.

Tickets for the special screening of Bog can be purchased here: https://bogmovie.com/

Mackenzie Martin / WXPR Public Radio

This Sunday, August 12th, Treehaven College of Natural Resources in Tomahawk is celebrating the installation of a labyrinth on their grounds. There will be an official ribbon cutting ceremony at 2:00 p.m., followed by the first official walk of the labyrinth. The event is free and open to the public and will feature a cake in the shape of a labyrinth.

Mackenzie Martin talked to the UW-Stevens Point student behind the project about how it came to be.

50 Years Strong: Running the Paavo Nurmi

Aug 8, 2018
Enni Gregas

Wisconsin’s oldest marathon – the Paavo Nurmi - is celebrating 50 years this Saturday, August 11th.

Just ahead, the story of a woman who is finally running the full marathon, 50 years after deciding to do it. WXPR’s Larry Lapachin has the story.

This Saturday, August 11, runners will gather in the quiet community of Upson, just outside of Hurley, to participate in Wisconsin’s oldest marathon, the Paavo Nurmi.  But for one participant, running the Paavo Nurmi marathon has been a goal ever since that inaugural race 50 years ago.

Mackenzie Martin / WXPR Public Radio

Last weekend was the Kentuck Day Festival, a festival held in Crandon each year that celebrates Forest County's early settlers from Kentucky. It’s been held every July for the past 48 years.

In the week leading up to the festival, there was something new added this year, though: a Kentuck Heritage Day Camp. Mackenzie Martin has the story.

The focus of the Kentuck Heritage Day Camp is to share the history of Forest County with the younger generation. Nine kids participated in the camp, ages 9-12.

Preserving the Past in a Northwoods Cabin

Jul 25, 2018
Jim Brown

As part of our new We Live Up Here feature series, we're telling stories about the people and culture in northern Wisconsin. 

Today, Northwoods resident Jim Brown has a story about how some old fashioned crank style telephones keep his family connected.

Crank callers were once considered a nuisance…but you might say my wife and I are proud to wear the title today.

That’s because a pair of old-fashioned crank-style telephones keeps our family connected in a very literal way. The grandkids love these things!

Mackenzie Martin / WXPR Public Radio

A unique art exhibit has been the focus at ArtStart Rhinelander for the last few weeks.

 

Mackenzie Martin has this report from the opening reception in June.

 

 

 

Over the past two years, Karen Bondarchuk has found more dead birds than at any other time in her life. The exhibit at ArtStart Rhinelander through August 18 is called - And by the Wind Grieved - and it’s all recreations of dead birds, both sculptures and paintings.

Mackenzie Martin / WXPR Public Radio

The number of children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder has been going up over the years.

Locally, there is a center in the Northwoods that aims to help children on the autism spectrum by using something called behavioral treatment… and they’ve recently expanded to Rhinelander.

Mackenzie Martin has the story.

The space located in Rhinelander’s Riverview Hall looks like a typical preschool with toys and books scattered about. There are some things that help you realize it’s a space for kids on the autism spectrum, though.

Jacob Shultz

This is the story of two ambulances and a resident in Boulder Junction who felt compelled to help out a small Alaskan town a few weeks ago.

 

Mackenzie Martin takes it from there.

Living in the Northwoods, we often feel like we live in small towns.

Mackenzie Martin / WXPR

In part one of our series on death care in the Northwoods, we talked to a local funeral director about green funerals and how his job has changed over the years. Today, we’ll hear about those who are choosing to have their funerals at home.

 

WXPR’s Mackenzie Martin reports.

 

 

Mackenzie Martin / WXPR

The death care industry has undergone a lot of changes in recent years and it’s more than just that formal burials are down and cremations are up.

In the first of a two part series about death care in the Northwoods, we’ll hear about green funerals and how the job of a local funeral director has changed. WXPR’s Mackenzie Martin reports.

So it turns out, there are a lot of options when you’re planning a funeral, a lot more than there were 20 or 25 years ago.

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