evers budget

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Wisconsin's debate over the next state budget is far from over, but the spending plan outlined by Democratic Gov. Tony Evers has strong support from advocates of older residents.

Helen Marks Dicks, state issues advocacy director for AARP Wisconsin, said her group was encouraged to see provisions like a tax credit for family caregivers as well as $200 million to enhance broadband internet access.

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  Gov. Tony Evers wants to spend $2.4 billion on building projects across 31 counties in Wisconsin over the next two years, with nearly a half of that going toward projects across the University of Wisconsin System.

Evers released his capital budget proposal on Monday. The state building commission is slated to vote on it next month, which would then send the plan to the Legislature’s budget committee which will then decide what to fund.

More than a third of Wisconsin’s 115,000 miles of drivable roads are considered to be in fair or below condition by the American Society of Civil Engineers.

The ASCE gives Wisconsin an overall C grade when it comes to infrastructure in the state. Conditions they say will only get worse if something isn’t done soon.

ASCE Fellow Martin Hanson says with proper funding road conditions in the state can be improved, but it will take a lot of money over many years.

Governor Tony Evers says his budget plan will help Wisconsin “Bounce Back” and recover from the COVID-19 pandemic.

He laid out his $91 billion state budget in an address Tuesday night. Evers started his address by acknowledging the worry many Wisconsinites are facing.

“Well, tonight, Wisconsin, I want to tell you this: it’s going to be ok. We are going to be ok,” said Evers.

Evers laid out what he called his “Badger Bounceback” agenda to help the state recover from the COVID-19 Pandemic.

iStock/Wisconsin News Connection

Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers' budget proposal includes a plan to legalize recreational marijuana.


The idea faces strong resistance from GOP leaders, but advocates say public polling shouldn't be ignored in the debate.

Evers' plan would allow residents 21 and older to possess small amounts of the drug, which would be taxed and regulated.

Fifteen states have either started, or are in the process of enacting, decriminalization programs, including neighboring states such as Illinois and Michigan. Minnesota leaders are debating the issue as well.